Going International – Great British Sewing Bee

First we saw contestants make a Chinese style top in sumptuous embroidered satin, then they had to use a sari length to create their own style in the 90 minute Alteration challenge and then an African inspired dress using a waxed printed cotton. So from shiny medium weight fabric, to soft slippery silky sari fabric and then a more robust printed cotton that needed pattern matching. Definitely challenging.

McCalls 7047, sew in satin and the peplum will stand out beautifully
McCalls 7047, sew in satin and the peplum will stand out beautifully

Making your own clothes is wonderful – it does mean that you can choose, not just what colour you want, but what type of fabric – which in turn can make or indeed break an outfit!  So my blog for this week is all about using these lovely fabrics successfully.

Of course, the pattern envelopes have guidance in the ‘suggested fabrics’ on the back of the pattern envelope – and any of these suggested fabrics will work well. But you can also experiment. A soft slippery fabric will drape into soft folds, whilst a crisp waxed cotton is better at holding a shape and satin  – well that just shouts glamour! To determine which type of fabric will work well, compare the suggested fabrics with your chosen one, is it a similar weight, will it pleat, gather and drape etc? This is easier if you are in a fabric shop and can handle the fabric – be bold, unroll a little and try draping, pleating or gather a little in your hand.

Having made your choice, arm yourself with the right needles for the job and suitable interfacing. Make sure you use a new needle which is properly sharp. A blunt needle can cause so many stitch problems, ranging from skipped stitches to snagged fabric. In fact you should change your needle every 8 hours of sewing or with every new project. For silks, satin and indeed cotton fabrics, a universal sharps is ideal, or even a lovely microtex needle which is fabulous for lightweight sari fabrics that are often made from georgette or chiffon if not polyester silks.

 

V8849
Vogue 8849, a peplum top with definite style – almost a mane! Definitely my favourite peplum top

Choose a stitch length of 2.2-2.5 for lightweight fabrics and consider seam choice. Satins can fray easily as can georgettes and silks, so raw edges must be neatened. Quickest is overlocked edges with a three-thread overlock stitch (remove the left needle for a three thread overlock stitch, which is narrower and therefore neater). For straight seams you can of course use a French seam, again particularly good for transparent fabrics as the seam allowances can be visible from the right side of the garment. Also to hem a transparent fabric, opt for a narrow rolled hem which minimises the see through of a hem allowance. For cottons, a double turned top stitched hem is ideal and for satins, a blind hem by hand or machine.

Oh, and my favourite pattern for a peplum top has to be Vogue 8849 – shown above. That shaped peplum definitely looks African inspired – indeed almost like a mane!

Butterick 6025, not actually a peplum, but the seam and deep pleats look like a peplum when worn with a belt
Butterick 6025, not actually a peplum, but the seam and deep pleats look like a peplum when worn with a belt

I also like Butterick 6026, because although not a peplum as such, the seaming is so slimming and easy to fit and worn with a belt as shown here, it looks like a peplum.

Sew on for now…

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